Baltimore Botches Arrest Warrants, Charges Wrong People In Freddie Gray Case

 Baltimore State Attorney Marilyn Mosby’s crusade to get justice in the Freddie Gray case just got off to an embarrassing start.

The Baltimore Sun reports that two of the six arrest warrants in the case were actually drawn up with the wrong person’s name on them.

As reported by Western Journalism, Mosby’s office has charged the six Baltimore Police officers who were involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray on April 12 with multiple criminal counts. Of those, one officer faces a second degree murder, and three others manslaughter, with all facing lesser offenses.

Officers Alicia White and Brian Rice were among the six officers charged; however, the City of Baltimore did not draw up arrest warrants for them, but for Alicia White, a school cafeteria worker from East Baltimore, and Brian Rice, a plumber from Brunswick, Md.

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 As soon as Mosby announced the charges last Friday, White and Mosby began receiving numerous calls from the media.

White’s attorney told the Sun, “The middle initial was off. Her address, her height, her weight, her driver’s license number – all of the information was my client’s information.” He added because of the City’s mistake, “Her life has been a living hell the past four days.”

The Baltimore Sheriff’s Office, which assisted Mosby’s State Attorney’s office in drawing up the arrest warrants, declined to comment for the Baltimore Sun story.

CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer called the mistake “pretty embarrassing.”

“If the city can’t even get the court charging documents right and innocent people are being harassed with phone calls from reporters and others, how will they secure conviction?” he asked.

The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) has called Mosby’s decision to charge the officers only one day after receiving the police report an “egregious rush to judgment.”

As reported by Western Journalism, FOP has also stated Mosby should step aside as the prosecuting attorney in the case given her multiple conflicts of interest, including the Gray family attorney, William Murphy, being a mentor to Mosby. He also contributed $5000 to her campaign last fall and helped lead her transition team.

Additionally, Mosby’s husband, Nick Mosby, is a city councilman in a district affected by the riots; so FOP argued the outcome of the trial will have a direct impact on his political future.

h/t: BizPac Review

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